Human digestive system

Gastric Cancer

Digestive System
The olfactory receptors are located on cell surfaces in the nose which bind to chemicals enabling the detection of smells. It has a flattened, rounded shape somewhat like a convex lens, with one side slightly larger than the other. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. The mucus component lubricates the walls of the intestine. Those organs send different juices to the first part of the small intestine. Pages with unresolved properties CS1 maint:

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Digestive Diseases

Consumed feed and the digestive juices from the salivary glands and proventriculus pass into the gizzard for grinding, mixing, and mashing. Inside of a chicken gizzard, with the internal lining removed. When allowed to free-range, chickens typically eat small stones. The stones remain in the gizzard until they are ground into pieces small enough to pass to the rest of the digestive tract.

Grit, a commercial product made up of small stones, can be used as a supplement to chicken feed. Chickens fed only commercially prepared feed do not need grit. Grit should not be confused with limestone or oystershell, which are given to laying hens as sources of calcium for their eggs' shells.

When a chicken eats a small, sharp object, such as a tack or staple, the object is likely to get stuck in the gizzard. Because of the strong grinding motion of the gizzard's muscles, such sharp objects can put holes in the gizzard wall. Chickens with damaged gizzards grow thin and eventually die. Preventing this situation is a good reason to keep a poultry house free of nails, glass shards, bits of wire, and so on. The small intestine is made up of the duodenum also referred to as the duodenal loop and the lower small intestine.

The remainder of the digestion occurs in the duodenum, and the released nutrients are absorbed mainly in the lower small intestine. The duodenum receives digestive enzymes and bicarbonate to counter the hydrochloric acid from the proventriculus from the pancreas and bile from the liver via the gall bladder. The lower small intestine is composed of two parts, the jejunum and the ileum.

The Meckel's diverticulum marks the end of the jejunum and the start of the ileum see Figure 6. In the egg, the yolk sac supplies the nutrients needed for the embryo to develop and grow. Right before hatch, the yolk sac is taken into the navel cavity of the embryo. The residual tiny sac is the Meckel's diverticulum. Location of the Meckel's diverticulum in the digestive tract of a chicken. The ceca plural form of cecum are two blind pouches located where the small and large intestines join.

Some of the water remaining in the digested material is reabsorbed here. Another important function of the ceca is the fermentation of any remaining coarse materials. During this fermentation, the ceca produce several fatty acids as well as the eight B vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, biotin, folic acid, and vitamin B Because the ceca are located so close to the end of the digestive tract, however, few of the produced nutrients are absorbed and available to the chicken.

Despite the name, the large intestine is actually shorter than the small intestine. The large intestine is where the last of the water reabsorption occurs. In the cloaca, the digestive wastes mix with wastes from the urinary system urates.

Chickens usually void fecal material as digestive waste with uric acid crystals on the outer surface—that is, chickens do not urinate. The color and texture of chicken fecal material can indicate the health status of the chicken's digestive tract: The reproductive tract also exits through this area. When a hen lays an egg, the vagina folds over to allow the egg to leave through the cloaca opening without coming into contact with feces or urine. These microflora aid in digestion.

When chicks hatch, their digestive tracts are virtually sterile. If raised by a mother hen, a chick obtains the beneficial microflora by consuming some of its mother's fecal material. In artificial incubation and brooding, chicks do not have this option. Through the probiotics, the chicks receive the beneficial bacteria they need to fight off infection by pathogenic bacteria, such as salmonella. Intestinal disease in chickens normally occurs when the balance of normal microflora is upset—that is, the normal microflora are overrun by too many foreign organisms.

The result is enteritis, or inflammation of the intestines. Enteritis produces symptoms that include diarrhea, increased thirst, dehydration, loss of appetite, weakness, and weight loss or slow growth. Try asking one of our Experts. This is where you can find research-based information from America's land-grant universities enabled by eXtension. View publishing information about this page.

Jacquie Jacob, University of Kentucky An understanding of the avian digestive system is essential for developing an effective and economical feeding program for your poultry flock and for recognizing when something is wrong and taking necessary actions to correct the problem. Running outward and backward from each sublingual papilla is a ridge the plica sublingualis that marks the upper edge of the sublingual under the tongue salivary gland and onto which most of the ducts of that gland open.

The gums consist of mucous membranes connected by thick fibrous tissue to the membrane surrounding the bones of the jaw. The gum membrane rises to form a collar around the base of the crown exposed portion of each tooth. Rich in blood vessels, the gum tissues receive branches from the alveolar arteries; these vessels, called alveolar because of their relationship to the alveoli dentales, or tooth sockets, also supply the teeth and the spongy bone of the upper and lower jaws, in which the teeth are lodged.

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